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To CMS or not to CMS that is the question!

#1
I was thinking of using a CMS for a project i am thinking of doing (hopefully one that will not die like most of my other ideas), I have narrowed the CMS down to Joomla or Conrete5

Robbie or anyone really can you check out the facts for Concrete5 and let me know which you think would have less overhead in terms of resource usage? Both Joomla and Concrete 5 are opensource so it really boils down to performance, and seeing as I am not a developer I am not sure if the features included with Conrete 5 are resource heavy or not.
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#2
I'd automatically opt for Joomla since I've never heard of Concrete 5. Fact is, Joomla can work exceptionally well for most projects. If you see your site getting 10,000 hits per second, no CMS will do well and custom programming will be required (which is why V3 is taking place)... but don't think because Category5 outgrew Joomla that Joomla isn't spectacular.

Joomla has a massive repository of add-ons (be careful, not all are good and/or safe), and it's very community-driven. I used it for many years successfully, and still use it for a lot of client sites. The new LTS is out, so it's a great time to start using Joomla.
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#3
(03-20-2012, 02:35 AM)Robbie Ferguson Wrote: I'd automatically opt for Joomla since I've never heard of Concrete 5. Fact is, Joomla can work exceptionally well for most projects. If you see your site getting 10,000 hits per second, no CMS will do well and custom programming will be required (which is why V3 is taking place)... but don't think because Category5 outgrew Joomla that Joomla isn't spectacular.

Joomla has a massive repository of add-ons (be careful, not all are good and/or safe), and it's very community-driven. I used it for many years successfully, and still use it for a lot of client sites. The new LTS is out, so it's a great time to start using Joomla.

I was thinking more that since I was on a shared hosting server that Joomla might consume more resources then the other i mentioned


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#4
It took us 4 years to get to that point Andrew. Realistically? I don't think it matters. If you ever outgrow Joomla, you're ready to build a custom site anyways.
Robbie Ferguson // The Bald Nerd

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#5
ok I thought you guys had the main site on a VPS
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#6
I have not done much with Joomla or Concrete5 until now other than a small test install some time ago. I did a little more with Drupal.

I think that you are better of with Joomla than with Concrete5, simply because there are much more people who use it, so you have a better chance at finding resources, find tutorials, get answers in forums, find books etc.

Concerning your server setup: That is not a problem unless you are expecting a lot of traffic. While shared hosting usually does not offer a lot of performance, that just means that you can handle less hits and that the requests might take a little longer to get fulfilled. But unless you have numerous people on your site at once all the time, the server will be idling most of the time anyway.

Most CMSs also offer caching mechanisms that will help. It won't necessarily make the site faster if you only have a few users a day, because normally caches are invalidated after a pretty short time, but it means that the server will not bog down as fast as one might think if the number of requests increases. (100 requests/s will not need 100 times the processing power of 1 request/s; it could be a LOT less than that depending on how aggressively the caching works and on other things like access statistics).
Of course, there always is a limit. You can also use a CMS for high traffic sites, but because a CMS is normally a very general system it's efficiency is not as high as that of a good specialized system. Still, you can have pretty big sites on a single server.
I think Category5 is a very special thing. It will probably have a large amount of requests around the time it airs and a lot less otherwise. Most sites will not have that problem and it will be a lot less variations in request rates.

I say give Joomla a try. It supposed to be fairly easy to learn the basics and because of the large number of plug-ins, you probably won't need to go into plug-in development.
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#7
Concrete5 is nice, but Joomla will have more support if needed. Really all CMS's are built to work well in shared hosting environments. Joomla is what I would recommend in this case.

I use Drupal currently for my dads store site (being depreciated as we speak and replaced with Lemonstand (not free)). It runs very well and is snappy, but we get like 20 hits per week if we are lucky currently.
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#8
Yes tordeu (nice to see you, by the way!) - Category5 TV is indeed a random beast as far as the host is concerned... we get regular traffic through the week (thousands per day), but Tuesday night at about 6:30pm the numbers get high, and between 7:00pm-7:15pm can sometimes hit 10,000 requests per second. We are not at all a normal test case, and our needs are very different from a standard web site.

By moving onto a custom solution, we'll be able to much better control the resource usage; especially when it comes to the size of mySQL queries (we can be much more specific than Joomla, loading only the content requested rather than entire tables), and we can do a lot by way of optimization and content distribution, but what *we* experience is *not* what the average or normal web site will experience. Normal web sites do not have a 1-hour per week window where their hits skyrocket by hundreds of thousands... ours does. So we have to keep things in perspective.

Joomla is an excellent choice. Category5 though? We've outgrown it. Will you? You'd have to be getting 10,000 hits per second in order to do so. In perspective, that's a relatively insane number... so even on shared hosting (which we have used up to this point) you'll do just fine.

I have many clients who get thousands of hits per day on Joomla and it works fantastically well. Sometimes you run into quirks with the cache system or what have you that needs tweaking (saw it recently with a client site) where it might hit 100% CPU usage on the server, but it's easily fixed with a little know-how.
Robbie Ferguson // The Bald Nerd

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#9
Time to point Drupal out again to Robbie...
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#10
And I'll remind you that, like this Concrete5, I have next to no experience with Drupal, so can't give any feedback or recommendations there.

You can always look through http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9...geNumber=1 but it's mildly inaccurate since it was written several months before Joomla's next LTS (2.5).
Robbie Ferguson // The Bald Nerd

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